Enchanting Moroccan Party and Decor Ideas

Enchanting Moroccan Party and Decor Ideas

Enchanting Moroccan Party and Decor Ideas

Join me on a journey of discovery, where Moroccan flavours and the vibrancy of colour, textile and textures enchant the soul.

The history of Portugal reflects a deep Moorish influence and now living in the Algarve it is especially evident in the architecture and food flavours. With a little research I discovered that the Romans established a capital called Olisipo, (now Lisbon) and the Moors’ capital was Xelb (modern day Silves, Algarve). I added the two links below for those of you that like to know a little more about the Moor influence in the Algarve and its history:

http://www.historyinanhour.com/2013/08/24/portugals-moorish-legacy

http://marocmama.com/6-moorish-influences-to-see-and-eat-in-portugal

In 1956 Morocco gained independence from France and this year it is being celebrated on the 18th November.

If you looking for some inspiration to add a little Moroccan or Bohemian flair to your home or table setting, then here are some great artifacts that I discovered by default whilst driving through Albufeira recently. (Albufeira was originally called Baltum by the Romans and then the Moors gave it the name Albufeira, Arabic for Castle of the Seas.) This incredible store called Fantasia Arte (the magic of Morocco) in Guild, Albufeira www.fantasia-arte.com

The wonderful owner of Fantasia-Arte allowed me to take these wonderful photographs that reflect the beauty of Moroccan artifacts. The colours and textures that were in this incredible store made me want to rush off and book a holiday to Morocco to experience it’s culture, food and market shopping.

Mix and match fabrics in deep spicy colours to bring the feel of Morocco to your table or home, a pop of colour always adds warmth to any space.

Tagines are an important part of Moroccan cooking and add colour to your dinner table as the food is served and cooked in the same vessel.

“Many Moroccan dishes take their name from a tagine, the clay or ceramic vessel in which they were traditionally cooked in. Although urban Moroccans may be more inclined to use modern cookware such as pressure cookers when making stews, tagines are still favored by those who appreciate the unique, slow-cooked flavor which the clayware imparts to the food. In addition, tagines remain the cookware of choice in many rural areas as a matter of cultural norms.

The word tagine has two meanings. First, it refers to a type of North African cookware traditionally made of clay or ceramic. The bottom is a wide, shallow circular dish used for both cooking and serving, while the top of the tagine is distinctively shaped into a rounded dome or cone.

Second, the word tagine refers to the succulent, stew-like dish which is slow-cooked in the traditional cookware. Typically, a tagine is a rich stew of meat, poultry or fish, and most often includes vegetables or fruit. Vegetables may also be cooked alone.”

More info and great food recipes can be found in: http://moroccanfood.about.com/od/moroccanfood101/a/Tagines_descrip.htm

Intricately designed lanterns reflect the most amazing light, almost as if the light is dancing and swirling on the walls creating a feeling of magic.

If you wanting to have a Moroccan dinner party at home here are a few ideas to get you started:

Decor:

Needs to be vibrant with different patterns and tones of ruby red, amethyst, purple, sapphire blue, emerald green and amber yellow all add to the Moroccan Theme. Add beautiful bright flowers and loads of candles in Moroccan style lanterns to create ambiance. Use scatter cushions in lush fabrics and if you really want to WOW your guests get some beautiful silk fabrics and drape them from the ceiling to create a Bedouin Tent effect.

 

Food:
Start with mezze platters filled with olives, dips, vegetables and breads. For mains serve either chicken or lamb stew served in a Tagine followed by a simple dessert.

Drinks:

Beer goes really well with Tagine and serve Mint Tea at the end of the meal to settle the richness of the food.

Second, the word tagine refers to the succulent, stew-like dish which is slow-cooked in the traditional cookware. Typically, a tagine is a rich stew of meat, poultry or fish, and most often includes vegetables or fruit. Vegetables may also be cooked alone.”

More info and great food recipes can be found in: http://moroccanfood.about.com/od/moroccanfood101/a/Tagines_descrip.htm

Mint Tea Set that can even be used as a centerpiece on your table

The above Items can be purchased from:

www.lecreuset.co.za

www.mrphome.com/enza/grand-temple-lantern-7202043842

http://www.moroccanhouse.co.za/moroccan-imports.php

 

Hope you enjoyed my Moroccan journey as much as I did. You can find some great Moroccan recipes in the November addition of the South African Food & Home magazine or on line @ www.foodandhome.co.za

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